December 8, 2016

Tips For A Perfect Yorkshire Pudding

Yorkshire puddings are airy British pastries very similar to an American popover. They take very few ingredients, typically just consisting of flour, egg, milk and oil, and then served along a savory meal, like beef and gravy. However, for a dish that takes such a small amount of ingredients, a lot can go wrong when trying to bake them. Many people enrolled in culinary certificate programs online make a couple of batches of Yorkshire puddings before they make a successful one. Save yourself some time and frustration, and follow these simple Yorkshire pudding tips:

Heat makes all the difference in a Yorkshire pudding.Heat makes all the difference in a Yorkshire pudding.

Choose your oil wisely
Yorkshire puddings are baked at a pretty high temperature, so it’s best to choose an oil that has a relatively high smoke point. Many people opt for olive oil, but sunflower or vegetable oil are the most effective when it comes to ensuring your puddings don’t stick to the pan. In fact, butter is another good option – not only does it have a high smoke point, but it makes the outer edge of your puddings taste more savory as well.

Prep ahead of time
As much as you might want to eat your Yorkshire pudding as soon as possible, it’s actually beneficial to prepare your batter the day before you want to bake it. While it’s certainly possible to bake your puddings right away, Serious Eats states that overnight resting lets the batter develop a better flavor. It allows more gluten to develop, giving your puddings a delectable eggy texture inside, with a crisp outer shell. A batch of puddings that rested overnight in the refrigerator will also rise taller than puddings that didn’t rest as long.

“Allow the batter to warm up to room temperature.”

Temperature matters
Another factor that plays a huge role in how tall your puddings get is the temperature of the batter before you bake them. Many people use refrigerated batter, especially if they’ve been allowing it to rest overnight. However, you’re more likely to get pleasantly fluffy puddings if you use batter that has warmed up to room temperature. This doesn’t mean allowing it to rest overnight outside of the refrigerator though! Since the eggs need to stay cold to prevent spoilage, your best bet is to allow the batter to warm for a half hour to an hour before you decide to bake it.

Egg whites can help
There are a couple of different ways that people like their puddings. Some people like a Yorkshire pudding to be large and fluffy, with an airy center. Others prefer a rich, custard-like pudding. If you fall into the former category, you’ll want to primarily use egg whites with a yolk or two. If you like a custardy pudding, use more egg yolk. The more yolk you use though, the smaller the puddings will be. A good way to get the best of both worlds is to use the recommended amount of full eggs, then add an extra yolk for good measure – making the insides savory and airy at the same time.

Heat the pan
It’s no secret that Yorkshire puddings are cooked in very hot temperatures, allowing the outer edge to crisp while the inside stays stretchy. But did you know that you’ll benefit from heating your pan or muffin tin before pouring the batter in as well? It also limits how much batter will get stick to the pan, making it easier to pop the puddings out when it comes time to dig in. This little step takes a mere five minutes and make your puddings more attractive and tasty.