September 16, 2016

The Internet's Most Viral Foods

It seems that just about anything can go viral these days. From memes that come and go to wedding reception dance routines that every middle aged relative seems to share on Facebook, there’s no determining what’s going to make the rounds on the internet. However, when foods go viral, it’s different story. When a restaurant or bakery – usually in New York – creates a new, sometimes puzzling concoction, word spreads across the internet, but can also lead to 10-block lines outside of the brick and mortar store, IRL. Here are some of the most viral foods of this day and age. People in online culinary certificate programs can take note:

Rainbow bagels
The rainbow bagel was created by Scott Rossillo, owner of the Bagel Store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Though the shop had been creating the brightly colored bagels and Funfetti cream cheese for the past two decades, there have only been lines outside the shop since February 2016, when Insider posted a video featuring them on its YouTube channel.

The cronut is one of the world's top viral foods.

The cronut is one of the world’s top viral foods.

 

Cronuts
The Cronut is a hybrid of the croissant and doughnut. While similar pastries have been served across the country, the original hails from the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York City. This tasty treat gained popularity in 2013, and it didn’t take long to hit cult status as one of the first foods to go viral. According to the New Times, at the peak of its popularity, there were even Craigslist scalpers selling the pastry for upwards of $100. Maybe it’s because the Cronut is delicious, or maybe the fact that they’re still so tough to get – the bakery only produces 350 per day – but the popularity still hasn’t waned.

Ramen Burger
There have been a lot of impostors, but the original Ramen Burger was created by ramen blogger, Keizo Shimamoto. This burger, sandwiched between two patties of , you guessed it, ramen noodles, made its first appearance at Brooklyn’s food festival Smorgasburg in 2014. Though Shimamoto didn’t work at a restaurant, he got to debut the concoction at Brooklyn eatery Sun Noodle’s booth. Growing up, Shimamoto spent a lot of time traveling between Tokyo and Los Angeles, so it seems only natural that he would think to combine the two distinct cultural foods.

Milkshakes
Remember that $5 milkshake that Vincent was so astounded by in “Pulp Fiction?” Well, that milkshake would have nothing on the wild candy milkshakes from Black Tap Craft Burgers and Beer in New York City. These overflowing milkshakes went viral this past summer, when the burger bar teamed up with online candy store IT’SUGAR to create crazy shakes with cotton candy and sugar crystal lollipops sticking out top. Other options are the Cookie, with an ice cream cookie sandwich hanging off the edge of the glass, and one garnished with a piece of cake. Images of the towering candy shakes have even been emblazoned on leggings!